Are You Ready to Go to War Over Unsubstantiated Claims of Russian Hacking?

Kurt Nimmo

The Trump Justice Department is going after Russian “spies” who allegedly hacked Yahoo.

“The Department of Justice is continuing to send a powerful message that we will not allow individuals, groups, nation states, or a combination of them to compromise the privacy of our citizens, the economic interests of our companies, or the security of our country,” said acting attorney general Mary McCord.

Meanwhile, the most sophisticated hacking group in the world gets a free pass, demonstrating the hypocrisy of the Trump administration.

The NSA’s Equation Group has targeted not only Russia, but also Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, India, Syria, and Mali. The NSA unit engineered the Stuxnet virus and has used zero-day attacks against targets.

In 2016, the hacking group “The Shadow Brokers” acquired malware code from the Equation Group. According to the whistleblower Edward Snowden, the code probably came from an NSA malware staging server.

The Shadow Brokers claimed the Equation Group tools are “state sponsored cyber weapons” and their release is a fight against the secret systems of “wealthy elites.”

The Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab has documented a link between the NSA and the Equation Group.

“Previously unreleased material from the Snowden archive proves that this data dump is real, and that the Equation Group is the NSA,” writes Bruce Schneier, a computer security analyst.

A recent WikiLeaks release shows a connection between the NSA, the CIA, and the Equation Group.

Naturally, none of this is on the Justice Department’s radar. Instead, despite Trump’s supposed olive branch overtures, the United States insists on building a case implicating Putin and the Russians in nefarious activity that pales when compared with the behavior of the NSA and CIA.

Earlier this week, NATO’s Deputy Supreme Allied Commander Europe, General Sir Adrian Bradshaw, said Russian hacking of European elections may trigger “collective defense measures” under Article 5 of the NATO charter. Bradshaw said that election interference may be such a case, explaining that “allegations of interference in American and European elections and an international disinformation campaign could cause the definition of an ‘attack’ to be widened” for purposes of Article 5, Just Security reports.

Germany’s secret services have found little evidence Russia is behind the alleged hacking of elections. “An open/direct control or financing through Russian state authorities or Russian intelligence agencies could not be proven in any cases,” a report issued by Germany’s BND states.

Instead, according to the BND, the German version of the CIA, the Russians are engaged in a “misinformation” campaign to disrupt the German elections.

“The Kremlin puts a lot of money into its soft power arms like [state news outlet] RT and we know that the Kremlin lies to a considerable degree for political effect. We also know there are attempts to carry out more covert and subversive acts—secret funding for political groups, that kind of thing,” Mark Galeotti, a Russian security specialist at the European Council on Foreign Relations, told Deutsche Welle.

The United States routinely uses this sort of behavior to influence elections and undermine disfavored states. The State Department and its NGOs have sponsored color revolutions, most recently in Ukraine, and the corporate propaganda media in the US has spread lies that have resulted in the deaths of millions of people, most notably in Iraq.

In 2011, the Pentagon said it will consider cyber attacks as an act of war. The British Ministry of Defense announced at the same time it will place cyber attacks on equal standing with other military conflicts.