Latest Clinton Scandal: Bill Used Your Money to Subsidize Clinton Foundation

Kurt Nimmo

The corruption of the Clintons appears to be endless.

Now it turns out Bill Clinton used tax money to “buy IT equipment — including servers — housed at the Clinton Foundation, and also to supplement the pay and benefits of several aides now at the center of the email and cash-for-access scandals dogging Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign,” according to Politico.

Politico offers an excuse for the behavior, something the establishment media routinely does for the Clintons.

This investigation, which is based on records obtained from the General Services Administration through the Freedom of Information Act, does not reveal anything illegal. But it does offer fresh evidence of how the Clintons blurred the line between their nonprofit foundation, Hillary Clinton’s State Department, and the business dealings of Bill Clinton and the couple’s aides.

The GSA hands out cash under the Former President’s Act, legislation “created to keep former presidents out of the poorhouse.”

Can you think of a president in recent history who ended up in the poorhouse?

Neither can I.

According to the 2015 U.S. Public Financial Disclosure Reports Hillary Clinton’s net worth is $31.3 million. Bill has a net worth of $80 million. That’s $111 million combined.

This latest revelation merely demonstrates how the Clintons and other “public servants” steal from the American people to enrich themselves and their cronies.

But never mind. Millions of people love Bill.

From Wikipedia:

As he was leaving office, a CNN/USA TODAY/Gallup poll revealed 45% said they’d miss him. While 55% thought he “would have something worthwhile to contribute and should remain active in public life”, 68% thought he’d be remembered for his “involvement in personal scandal”, and 58% answered “No” to the question “Do you generally think Bill Clinton is honest and trustworthy?”. 47% of the respondents identified themselves as being Clinton supporters. 47% said he would be remembered as either “outstanding” or “above average” as a president while 22% said he would be remembered as “below average” or “poor”.

Photo: Gage Skidmore